Frog Pond – Assessment 3 Audio

•June 12, 2008 • Leave a Comment

I had so much fun with this one. Originally I planned to make a short sound file, kind of like a small musical piece (techno music) but when I came across a frog-like sound I decided to make an audio file that sounded like a nature recording from a forest pond.

I did cheat a little by downloading a thunder storm .wav file, but I think this is necessary to give the piece some ‘background’ noise. This was easy to set up and since the .wav file was long you can’t hear an obvious repeat.

The other three sounds are short .wav files. Two are drum sounds and the ‘frog’ is some electronic sound.

Basically I fiddled with the drum sounds, applying a random number generator to see what they’d sound like at random play speeds. These sounded ok, but I wanted the ‘crickets’ and ‘bugs’ to have more of a chaotic randomness to them. I achieved this by applying another random generator to the random generator, so that at any time the file could be playing up to a differing amount of random play speeds, greatly increasing the different sounds created. I changed these random numbers until I was satisfied with the ‘crickets’ and ‘bugs’ sound.

The frogs where built on a similer process. I created the one random frog sound at first. The play speed could not be set too high as the sound was nothing like a frog at all. The first thing I wanted to do after made one frog was to give him some buddies to talk with. So I copied him three times and set them up side by side. Here I realised that I didn’t need to copy half the code, all the frogs could access the same .wav file but could ‘croak’ at different times by using different random numbers for the play speed. So I rearranged them all and then had the best idea (well I thought so at least). I wanted to give the frogs some depth to their ‘croaking’. At first they where all linked to the same volume control. I looked at my laptop and imagined it was a pond with some frogs sitting around it. Then looking at the volume slider I noticed it had one slider for the left speaker and another for the right speaker. AHA! So I then changed it so that each frog had their own single volume control. I deleted 2 sets of volume sliders and linked each frog to one of the remaining sliders: 2 frogs in the left speaker, and 2 on the right. Each frog now had a place around the pond, and I set the volume for each to be quiet (for the frogs at the back of the pond) to loud for those that where close.

This lead me to give each sound its own volume slider so that I could alter them while recording.

I’m think the final outcome is ok. I could go back and add in a few bird sounds as well. One thing that I would really like to change is the pitch/tone of the frog croaks. If I have enough time I will try and figure out how to do that.

Below is a screenshot of the finished PD file. It looks a bit messy but I tried to neaten it as much as possible. I think there should be some way of making lines a different colour, and giving them a z-axis dimension so that it looks like some are going behind the rest of the program.

Here is a URL to the audio from one of the recordings:
http://www.mediafire.com/?mel1txqm2m9

Here is a link to the PD file:

http://www.mediafire.com/?mmybfwkiwwd

If your interested, here are the URL’s to the 4 .wav files used in this program:
Thunder and Rain file: http://www.mediafire.com/?d5zyhllcxgi
Track 1 – Crickets: http://www.mediafire.com/?2ytmhwimdbd
Track 2 – Bugs: http://www.mediafire.com/?ommyziidmtx
Track 3 – Frogs: http://www.mediafire.com/?wnzn0c9mg1d

~ Fin ~

Building Blocks

•June 7, 2008 • Leave a Comment

Here is one of my 3 final comp arts pieces. I wanted to create a dynamic image that changed with the movment of the mouse.

I started with a basic square and got it to move across the screen with the mouse’s horizontal movement. Then add in another square on the same line that moved with vertical mouse motion. Building on these, I created a frame which is made of 8 moving squares in total.

I then added the ‘drawing’ square which leaves a trail of square as the mouse moves.

Next I added colour to the piece and decided to randomly change the square’s colour to give it more ‘life’. 

I added some random numbers to give the piece unique colours each time the program is run. Sometimes you may end up with horrible colours, but other times the overall visual is interesting (well, to me at least). At one point I added a random generator for each RBG value for the squares, but the overall effect was looked as appealing as fluro vomit, not a pretty sight. Using just the random generator for the red value gives the result a kind of suiting colour scheme.

I wanted to give the user more interaction than just moving the mouse, so I included a left and right mouse click option to move the border squares in or out with each click. The still images at the end look the same, but when using the program they have obvious differences.

While this piece is relatively simple, I really like the end product.

I’ve include the code below for the first program with 2 images, and the code for the second program with 1 image. I’d recommend just copying the 2nd version to play with in processor.

First Blockbuilder Code:

int x = 25;
int y = 50;
float r1 = random(0, 255);
float r2 = random(0, 255);
float r3 = random(0, 255);

void setup() {
  background(r1, r2, r3);
  size(500, 500);

void draw() {
  //top 2 rectangles
  rect(mouseX, x, y, y);
  rect(mouseY, x, y, y);
 
  //bottom 2 rectangles
  rect(mouseX, height-x-y, y, y);
  rect(mouseY, height-x-y, y, y);
 
  //left 2 rectangles
  rect(x, mouseX, y, y);
  rect(x, mouseY, y, y);
 
  //right 2 rectangles
  rect(width-x-y, mouseX, y, y);
  rect(width-x-y, mouseY, y, y);
 
  //movable rectangle
  fill(random(0, 255), r2, r3);
  stroke(random(0, 255), r2, r3);
  rect(mouseX, mouseY, y, y);
}

—————————————————-

2 images from the first program:

)reminds me of winter

With these 2 images there is a persistant border.

************************************************************

Code for the final Blockbuilder program.

int x = 25;
int y = 50;

float r1 = random(0, 255);
float r2 = random(0, 255);
float r3 = random(0, 255);
void setup() {
  background(r1, r2, r3);
  size(500, 500);

void draw() {
  //top 2 rectangles
  rect(mouseX, x, y, y);
  rect(mouseY, x, y, y);
 
  //bottom 2 rectangles
  rect(mouseX, height-x-y, y, y);
  rect(mouseY, height-x-y, y, y);
 
  //left 2 rectangles
  rect(x, mouseX, y, y);
  rect(x, mouseY, y, y);
 
  //right 2 rectangles
  rect(width-x-y, mouseX, y, y);
  rect(width-x-y, mouseY, y, y);
 
  //movable rectangle
  fill(random(0, 255), r2, r3);
  stroke(random(0, 255), r2, r3);
  rect(mouseX, mouseY, y, y);
}

void mousePressed() {
  if (mouseButton == LEFT) {
    x = x + 50;
  } else  {
    x = x – 50;
  }
}

—————————————————

Image from final Blockbuilder program:

I think this would be great to have linked to music. Have the colours and square movement change with the pitch and tempo of the music, and project it against a wall at a rave or club.

 

Levitated Design & Code:

•May 22, 2008 • Leave a Comment

This website is fantastic. I had fun chasing the bubbles around for a while xD.
I really like the aesthetics of their artwork and find it even more interesting to know that they have been generated from programs.

Levitated Design & Code

The idea of generating evolutionary processes to create wonderous flora and fauna is great. It has scientific use and is artistically pleasing.

Electronic Music

•May 22, 2008 • Leave a Comment

Back in the old days (when I had long hair, listened to Metallica, played the guitar and had aspirations of creating a heavy metal band with my best friend) I had a disdain for electronic music. My thoughts on it at the time was that it was ‘fake’ and didn’t require any talent to create.

I have a completely different outlook on it today though. Even just creating that basic PD audio file and messing with the play speeds gave some awesome and eerie sounds – one of my favourites sounded something like alien insects.

You can create so many unique sounds with just a laptop and the PD program! I’m going to attempt to create an ‘instrumental’ piece by layering some loops together for part of assessment 3.

Another aspect of computational arts in general that I like is the improvised manor of experimenting and creating. I have a good sketch book at home, but rarely draw in it as I don’t want to draw crappy pictures in it and ruin it. With the computer I can make as many crappy programs as I want, delete the truly awful ones, learn from my mistakes and not worry about any wastage – and, if by some miracle I make something worthy – share it with the world on the web.

Wk 8: Tick Tock

•May 22, 2008 • Leave a Comment

The following link takes you to the clock I created with Quartz Composer:

 What’s the time Mr Wolf?

PD Audio File

•May 22, 2008 • Leave a Comment

Haha, finally got it to work, so simple once you know how.

I set the random number generator to 10 and gave and modifier of -5, so some of the music is playing backwards at play speeds of -5 to -1, while there are some gaps of silence at 0.

http://www.mediafire.com/?w2nmn2m9jxj

Unlimited Free Image and File Hosting at MediaFire

Week 2: This Blog =)

•May 1, 2008 • Leave a Comment

The blog you are looking at is the completed task for week 2…but you already knew that.

I tried to make a blog that was connected to the CI server, but that failed miserably😦

I then made another blog directly from WordPress, but that had problems too x(

Now, here is the final blog!

As it is not connected to the CI server I cannot save files there…I think…and upload them here.

So, you will probably see a lot of code text instead….and links to art work that I like.

That is at least until I figure out how to do it properly.

 
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